Vue model factories

Laravel inspired model factories for Vue (or any front-end application)

Version: 0.0.19 Updated: 12/15/2018

By: danjfletcher License: MIT

Downloads Last 30 Days: 104

Vue Model Factories

A Laravel inspired model factory for VueJS

https://opensource.org/licenses/MIT

Install

npm i -S vue-model-factories

Basic Usage

In main.js

import store from './store'
import Vue from 'vue'
import VueModelFactory from 'vue-model-factories'
//...

const FactoryModels = {
  User: {
    name: "Miles",
    email: "example@email.com",
    role: 1
  },
  Cat: {
    name: "Mittens",
    owner: "Miles"
  }
}

const factory = new VueModelFactory(store).define(FactoryModels).build()

Object.defineProperty(Vue.prototype, 'factory', {
  value: factory
})

//...

In any Vue component

let user = this.factory('User').make() // {name: "Miles", email: "example@email.com", role: 1}

You can also use create() which will commit the object to the store. By default, you will need to have a mutation set up with the naming convention of add${model} (i.e. addUser) for this feature to work.

Alternatively, if you would like to set your own naming convention you can pass in your Factory Models like this:

{
  User: {
    data: {
      name: "Miles",
      email: "example@email.com",
      role: 1
    }
    mutations: "pushUser"
  },
}

When this object is passed to the factory's define() method, it will know to use the value of mutation when committing to the store.

let user = this.factory('User').create() // user is committed to store

Making multiple models

You can pass a number as the second argument to the factory() function. By default this value will be 1, and the factory will return a single object. If you pass any number greater than 1 you will receive an array of the created objects instead.

let users = this.factory('User', 2).make()
console.log(users)

Output:

  [{
    name: "Miles",
    email: "example@email.com",
    role: 1
  },
  {
    name: "Miles",
    email: "example@email.com",
    role: 1
  }]

Advanced usage

Passing overrides

Of course you likely don't want to create multiples of the same model. You can either use a library like faker directly in your FactoryModel or optionally, you can always override the defaults (which can be handy for unit testing). Or a combination of both.

There are two options for overriding, either through an object, or you can pass a callback.

Passing an object

let users = this.factory('User', 2).make(
  {
    name: faker.name.firstName(),
    email: faker.internet.email()
  }
)

This will give you a random fake email and name, which overrides the FactoryModel defaults. This is nice when you're makeing a single model, but when you want a collection of models, each model will get the same values.

Passing a callback

To solve this you can either chain .forEach off of the make() or create() methods, or you can pass a callback like this:

let users = this.factory('User', 2).make(user => {
    return {
      name: faker.name.firstName(),
      email: faker.internet.email()
    }
  })

Relationships

Relationships can be created between models by using the create() method and callbacks. For example you may want a owner to pet relationship:

const user = this.factory('User').create(user => {
  return {
    ...user,
    id: 1, // this could be auto-incremented or generated at the Model Factory
    pet: this.factory('Cat').create({id: 1}).id
  }
})

Of course this example could be normalized. The user doesn't really need a reference to the pet, but it's shown here for demonstration.

Here's a much more complicated example that combines object overrides with callbacks and chaining forEach() just to demonstrate the flexibility of this factory:

factory('Person', 50).create(person => {
  factory('Sensor').create({
    asset: person.id
  })
  return {
    ...person,
    tools: [...(factory('Tool', _.random(1, 3)).create({
      person: person.id
    }).forEach(tool => factory('Sensor').create({
      fields: {
        asset: tool.id
      }
    })))].map(tool => tool.id)
  }
})

Admittedly that is not the prettiest code to read. But of course you can abstract all the complexity however you wish.

A Note on Auto Incrementing

Currently there's no support for auto incrementing fields such as id's. However you can get around this with several ways. One example is to naively produce random numbers for the id of your factory model objects like this:

const FactoryModels = {
  User: {
    id: parseInt(Math.random()*1000000000),
    name: "default name"
  },
  Post: {
    id: parseInt(Math.random()*1000000000),
    title: "default title",
    content: "Shrek is love..."
  }
}

We're making a random number that's 9 digits long in the above example which for the purposes of mocking data, is probably going to be fine. If you really feel like you're going to have duplicate id's with this approach you could also use a library such as uuid.

Using with TypeScript

Although this library is not written in TypeScript, a .d.ts file is included for TypeScript projects. The only difference when creating a new instance of the factory function is you no longer call new on the VueModelFactory import. For example:

import VueModelFactory from 'vue-model-factories'

const factory = VueModelFactory(store).define(FactoryModels).build()
Categories: Vue js